From Ubuntu Studio to Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon

Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop overlapping Ubuntu Studio desktop

Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop overlapping Ubuntu Studio desktop

After installing a second monitor on the Ubuntu Studio, the panel or taskbar, as they called it in Windows, loses its transparency setting. It is one of those minor quirks in Linux that you can live with but still I decide to give a check on others. I opt to install Linux Mint Xfce edition since it has the same Xfce desktop environment that by now I am a little familiar with. It seems to be working fine with all the panels transparency in working order.

I proceed to install all the application programs that I require without a hitch until I begin to set the icc profiles for the monitors and printers. That is where I get the first hindrance. Linux Mint Xfce does not have a program to install the profiles for the devices mentioned. Obviously the next step is to install the program for the profile loader, gnome colour manager in this case. It goes along smoothly with no problem at all except that the program is nowhere to be found and I am not able to execute it even in command line. Maybe it is not compatible with the desktop but even the KDE version gives the same result. I am not very familiar with Linux and to save time I ditch it and look for a distro that have a colour manager program by default. I find 3 to start with, they are Ubuntu 14.04, Linux Mint 17 KDE and Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon editions.

The Colour program in MInt Cinnamon to set the icc profiles

The Colour program in MInt Cinnamon to set the icc profiles

Since I am an old-school computer user who prefer the taskbar/panel right down below the screen with the necessary information on it, I skip on Ubuntu and Linux Mint KDE is given the boot, no pun intended. It’s great, very customisable, only to be given away by its menu, it is not to my liking. I am now left with Linux Mint Cinnamon and wow, no wonder it is the most popular distro right now in the Linux world.

Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop and menu

Linux Mint Cinnamon desktop and menu

Now with all the printers installed, dual monitors up and running, profiles and the necessary programs loaded, the computer is now ready at last. One thing that is missing is the network monitor though.  The KDE and Xfce desktop environments have it.  This is to make sure that the computer is not leaking to the net without your knowledge.  I just hope that it won’t be long that someone patch up the KDE or Xfce version into a desklet as they termed it in Cinnamon.

Update 7 Feb 2016:  The problem with network monitoring is now solved.  I bought a used small PC just for Internet.  After installing Cairo Dock, I realised that there is an applet named Netspeed which I never did see before and it can be moved to the desktop.  Here’s the screenshot of the desktop.

Netspeed

Linux: From Toe Testing To Flat Footing

UbuntuSudio Desktop

UbuntuStudio Desktop

I had tried Linux once in a while as time went by and I had seen the improvements made over the years. Still, I wasn’t ready to have a system based on it. Last few weeks I spent trying out a few of the Linux distros to check if it was time for me to have a permanent installation instead of just install and delete. I was in need of another computer and I wanted to know if the time had come for me to have a Linux box permanently.

After some searching, reading, downloading, burnt a few cds and trying, I must say that now Linux is practically more than ready for the masses. It works right after installation though you still need to install the printer driver which is easy if supported and the proprietary graphics card driver instead of the default driver, if you want the real deal (initially this needs some sweating though).

Graphics card and printers installed

Graphics card and printers installed

There are still some loose ends to be tackled but they are not of great concern. Things like installing application programs and hardware drivers especially graphics cards and printers if they are not in the repositories at hand (the default distro repositories right after installation) which are still quite technical. Thus I hope in the near future, the Linux developers communities could make the installation/removing process of application programs and hardware drivers unified and simple, whatever the variant of the Linux OS that is used. These will entice the application developers and hardware manufacturers to produce products that will also target the Linux OS platform.

I decided to settle for UbuntuStudio because it had groups of programs for audio production, video production, graphic design, photography and publishing. The decision was not hard to make as the new pc was primarily intended for photography post processing.

Application programs

Application programs

Installation was straight forward and fast (without internet connection). At the reboot, it was done, unlike Windows 7 installation that has to go through 3 reboots to get it done. But what is more important is the feeling I get in using it, I must say that it is a pleasure. The booting up process, shutting down process and opening and closing of application programs (same programs used in Windows 7) are fast compared to Windows 7. I am so satisfied that I am now shifting my body weight slightly over to this foot standing on the Linux OS.

So you wanna upgrade your computer?

The OS of choice for the general PCs currently is coming from Microsoft. As of this moment, the latest offering from Redmond is Windows 7. There are several flavours to choose from, depending on one’s requirement. Each of these flavours come in two version i.e. 32 bits and 64 bits.

I would surely recommend the 64 bits version. Its the future and most current hardware should be able to run it. More data is being moved and compute in a single clock as compared to 32 bits, it should be faster. Furthermore, currently it has much much less, practically none known viruses as compared to it’s 32 bits counterpart.

Linux provides a free alternative OS. If you have not heard of any, try searching for ‘Ubuntu’. It’s quite easy to use now as compared to few years ago. My personal belief is that it is still a lil bit geeky but otherwise easy. Hopefully there will be great improvement in the near future. I am waiting for that jump.